Archive for the ‘Indian NGO’ Category

e-Learning (8 C’s ) – Shiksha : Education Equity through technology tools

March 12, 2007

“The illerate of the 21 century will not to be those who can not read and write but those who can not learn, unlearn & relearn”- Alvin Toffler  

Dear Friends,  This is a very nice e-Learning Model for facilitating education through technology tool with synergetic efforts of all stakeholders.    CII-Shiksha has created an 8 component model to deliver the program and to ensure a meaningful impact on the teaching-learning process in the schools.The schools put in their efforts by way of three components which are Computers, Connectivity and Commitment. CII-Shiksha provides Content , Coaching and Communication  components – Creativity and Collaboration. components to the program. The outcome of the mutual contribution are the two. 

Pillars of e- Learning 8 Component Model:

  1. Creativity
  2. Communication
  3. Collaborations
  4. Commitment
  5. Computers
  6. Connectivity
  7. Contents
  8. Coaching

Program Details: http://shikshaindia.org/details.html

CII-Shiksha Motto-Five all’s: 

  • Covering all – catering to all categories of academic institutes
  • Open to all – sharing of source code
  • All states
  • All Languages
  • All subjects

 Objective of Shiksha India:

·      To equip schools with Shiksha platform comprising of Content, Coaching and Communication.

·      To develop a network of like minded partners (organisations, institutes and individuals) and facilitate to bring in their expertise to the Shiksha schools, in terms of manpower, resources, projects/programs, etc.

·      To develop a network of schools and provide with a platform to combine their efforts and reach common identified goals without efforts being  duplicated and resources being  wasted.

·      To provide a forum for students and teachers across the country to collaborate, share and showcase their creativity.

·      To  network with other similar initiative and provide special synergies for the schools in the Shiksha network

Source: http://shikshaindia.org/index.html

Ajay Singh Niranjan Email: ajay_uor (at) yahoo (dot) com

********************************************** Knowledge and ignorance are the two unborn ones. One is the ruler and the other, the ruled. Apart from these two, there is another who is also unborn and who is connected with the enjoyer and his enjoyment. And then there is the infinite self, the universal form, who is non-doer. When one knows this triad, one has known Brahman (cosmic consciousness).”- Upanishad

Effective Artciles which align to above article. Kindly link and share your expereince.

——-||||||Effective Quotations by Great Thinker||||||——- 

 Gearge Bernard Shaw:::Mahatma Gandhi ::: Swami VivekanandaPeter F. Drucker :::Warren Bennis ::: Jack Welch

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i Watch – Education First – Transforming India

March 12, 2007

Dear Friends,

I am happy to share that the book of i watch: Transforming India” 2007 edition has been formulated  in a very concrete, simple and concise manner by a team of intellectuals through extensive research work in these focused areas .This book is available in 13 indian languages.  

Focus of ” i watch -Transforming India”:  

Human Resource , Education & Training: Holistic human development , education matrix of India, primary education & 100% functional literacy , Vocational education & training-the real winner for India, Advantage of enterprise skill development  & vocational education.

Employment Generation: HRD-Employment & Unemployment, Employment matrix of India, Employment generation thru’ VET, Employment generation through SME’s, Employemnt Generation implementation of VET.   

Economy & Enterprise: The real & virtual India, Poverty line & related data, How to plans for world markets? A chek list, Definition of Small medium enterprise, India must become an international Hub, Important of SMEs. China-India comparison chart, catch me if you can, comparision with selected countries.

Governance & Administration: the India you may not know, Transforming India: Agenda for change, Economic & business reform, Governance & administration of India, Good governance can transfer India into a superpower, Good governance + Effective administration = Zero corruption, World class governance-why & how India must do it.   

Edited, Published and Printed for i Watch by Krishan Khanna.   i Watch – Education 1st , www.wakeupcall.org 

Kindly contact me for complete information & details of i watch-Transformaing India book. 

Ajay Singh Niranjan

i Watch – Education First – Transforming India

Email :  ajay_uor (at) yahoo (dot) com

********************************************** Knowledge and ignorance are the two unborn ones. One is the ruler and the other, the ruled. Apart from these two, there is another who is also unborn and who is connected with the enjoyer and his enjoyment. And then there is the infinite self, the universal form, who is non-doer. When one knows this triad, one has known Brahman (cosmic consciousness).”- Upanishad

Effective Artciles which align to above article. Kindly link and share your expereince.

~Ajay Singh Niranjan ~   

Seeking Money and Meaning in the NGO World

February 12, 2007

People who work for non-profits often have a strong social conscience and a desire to “do good.” Good intentions, though, are rarely enough to ensure effective outcomes; they must be combined with business skills before these organizations can achieve their goals. In this inaugural edition, India Knowledge@Wharton presents a special report devoted to non-profits that are trying to learn how to function like, well, for-profit businesses. The first article surveys a number of organizations that are grappling with this challenge, while the second takes an in-depth look at Aseema, a Mumbai-based non-profit that has been struggling to build a products division — with some support from Wharton students. The third story, an essay by the founder of a non-profit organization, challenges conventional ideas on how poverty can be fought.


Indian NGOs: Learning to Walk the Line between Social Responsibility and Commercial Success
India’s social sector has in recent years seen a surge in funding and other support from global nonprofits, venture funds and individuals; it has also proliferated, rapidly expanding in depth and reach. The upshot has been a dramatic increase in the induction of professional management practices, creative networking between donors, other intermediaries and beneficiaries, and a greater rigor in the viability and performance appraisal of funded projects. These efforts are paying off and getting NGOs (non-governmental organizations) away from their traditional model of sustaining themselves solely through charitable contributions.
Case Study: How Aseema Seeks Business Success without Selling Its Soul
Ten years ago, when Aseema began its journey to educate underprivileged children, the road was not clear, nor was a destination in sight. But today, this not-for-profit organization has achieved reach and scale. Over the years, the sustained efforts at managing and streamlining its work professionally have enabled Aseema to change its operational and structural imperatives without losing sight of its goal. The Aseema story focuses the spotlight on the successes, problems and strategies that guide not-for-profit efforts in India.
Why the Fight against Poverty Is Failing: A Contrarian View

Abraham George is the founder of The George Foundation, an NGO engaged in humanitarian work in India, and the author of India Untouched: The Forgotten Face of Rural Poverty. In this contrarian essay, he explores why the current strategies that governments and development agencies are employing to reduce poverty are not working the way they should. Among his arguments: Microcredit programs, as they are now practiced in India, do little to help the poor.

Source : India Knowledge@warton

Link: http://knowledge.wharton.upenn.edu/india/special_section.cfm?specialID=1

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Indian NGOs: Learning to Walk the Line between Social Responsibility and Commercial Success

February 3, 2007

In rain-starved villages in the remote interiors of India where subsistence farming has long been the norm, farmers have been driven to debt and death by the vagaries of the weather. Uncertain monsoons have forced many farmers to choose between migration and abject poverty.

Muniyappa was one such farmer. Maintaining his 1.5 acre banana farm in the rural districts of Bangalore was becoming a struggle, one he was ready to give up for urban life. What changed his mind was a product called KB Drip, an irrigation system that ensured controlled and year-round access to water. The product was developed by IDEI, the New Delhi-based Indian arm of International Development Enterprises, a non-profit in Lakewood, Colorado, that aims to use “market principles” as it works to help rural farm families improve their agricultural productivity.

Sumita Ghose, founder and CEO of Rangsutra, a Gurgaon company that focuses on livelihood issues of rural artisans and farmers, started the company 15 years ago as a non-governmental organization (NGO). But over time, she decided the NGO model didn’t work best for Rangsutra and turned it into a business. Says Ghose: “Ownership is a very big motivating factor, and we decided to start a company with artisans and farmers as shareholders.”

IDEI and Rangsutra are part of a growing breed of nonprofits and other Indian entities working for the underprivileged that have become business-savvy and embraced modern management methods. 

India has always been a fertile ground for social issues of all hues. Its rampant poverty, unemployment, disease and illiteracy have drawn voluntary organizations and financial support from philanthropists, charities and religious trusts.

That old order is changing. Social commitment is no longer the preserve of voluntary workers. Conventional business and management metrics are being bundled into a package with unconventional means of finance to provide unique solutions for large social problems. Knowledge@Wharton spoke to NGOs and their financial sponsors who are making the transition from a “charity mode” to a professionally run model in an attempt to grasp the nature and extent of the changes underway. In the emerging NGO landscape, scale is important and so is sustainability. And both depend on an innovative and steady flow of funds.

IDEI produced a Bollywood-style film to promote the $30 KB Drip and convince farmers about the benefits of drip irrigation. It has so far sold innovative irrigation products to more than 85,000 farmers in India. It is one of the many companies backed by Acumen Fund, a global non-profit venture fund based in
New York City, and part of the Fund’s $1.4 million “water portfolio.” Varun Sahni, the Hyderabad-based country manager of Acumen Fund in India, says his fund chose to back IDEI because, “we look [to support] ventures that are going to have lasting social impact.”

Life as a corporate entity is proving to be more bountiful for Rangsutra. Its artisan shareholders invest an initial Rs. 1,000 each ($22) and have a say in the company’s operations. In its first year (2005-06), Rangsutra managed to break even with revenues of Rs. 26 lakh ($56,500). “We are planning to go over Rs. 1 crore this year ($218,000),” says Sumita.  Rangsutra is supported by Aavishkaar Venture Funds, which is described by its CEO Vineet Rai as a regular commercial fund that “wants to invest in businesses that make money with a social commitment.”

The lines between for-profit and non-profit ventures are beginning to blur. The focus everywhere, not just in
India, is on building sustainable development models. There is also an increasing realization that the traditional models have had a limited impact on the problems they sought to resolve.

A glaring example in India is the education sector. Over the years, there has been sustained government intervention through programs like the Sarva Shiksha Abhiyan (mass literacy movement) that aim to put every child in school. Lots of NGOs have been working in the sector for decades. And even though there are instances of remarkable achievements by individual NGOs, observers say these efforts have yet to translate into a significant nationwide impact.

A survey conducted in 2003 by Pratham, a Mumbai NGO active in the city’s slums and backed by Indian private bank ICICI Bank, is revealing. The survey says the percentage of children in the country who can read nothing and those who can read only the alphabet is about 52%; 40% drop out before completing primary school; and 11% of the children do not enter school. “We realize that a single experiment is not going to make a difference,” says Usha Rane, director-curriculum at Pratham Resource Centre. “At Pratham, we think like the government. We think mass.”

Scale Matters

The majority opinion within the social development sector is that it is not enough to create isolated models of excellence. As Rane explains, “It is necessary to create a mass movement.” Pratham operates out of 14 states. In the 10 years of its existence, it has developed reading and mathematics kits that are being used to teach the basic concepts to unlettered children. Nearly 1.6 lakh children have benefited from the program in the last three years.

Like Pratham, many NGOs are working scale into their operations. Muthu Velayuthan who has been involved with migration and livelihood issues in the villages of Tamil Nadu, Karnataka and Andhra Pradesh, has set up a rural production and retail network under the brand “Aaharam.” He says that his work in the villages showed him the tremendous potential that is locked up in the Indian rural framework.

He developed Aaharam as a supply network that organizes small self help groups into a federation and links that to a producers’ cooperative. That cooperative in turn processes the agricultural produce into a range of agro products such as spices, pulp and juice. It also retails these in the rural market.

In its first year, Aaharam reached out to 1,000 families and created an inter-state platform of 160 federations. Its current monthly turnover is over Rs. 3 lakh ($6,500), and it is expanding its network of states and federations at great speed. “Our mandate,” says Velayuthan is “to promote traditional markets.”

Aaharam, like several such organizations, walks the line between social responsibility and commercial success. It applies corporate marketing and business strategies to further the interest of a marginalized population. And in the process, it builds economies of scale into its operations.

Devashri Mukherjee, the Mumbai-based director of venture programs at Ashoka: Innovators for the Public, a global association of social entrepreneurs based in Arlington, Virginia, points to another example: Nidaan, a company run by Arbind Singh in Bihar. Singh focuses on the very poor and marginalized sections of society in one of India‘s most backward states. He organizes them into co-operatives and links them into a marketing group that not only protects their rights but also guides them to making financially sound decisions with respect to sales and production.

What emerges from these experiences is an innovative chain of scale, professional management and funding support that links these organizations in a web of sustainable growth. Scale increases the bargaining power of groups. A professional management team sharpens focus and enhances efficiency. And finance works in two ways: as a catalyst that helps build the other links in the chain and as a growth pill that creates sustainable models out of small beginnings.

Clicking on the Right Links

Traditionally, fund support has been a key imponderable for NGOs. Since most NGOs were — and many still are — primarily dependent on grants and donations, they faced the constant threat of their money resources drying up.

There are two ways in which the sector is getting around this problem. One is through the well documented rise of micro finance institutions (MFIs). Micro credit has had its successes and failures, but MFIs have helped significantly increase awareness and interest in the rural sector. The other development is the emergence of social venture funds such as Aavishkaar and Acumen and the development of organizations that link donors to NGOs such as Give Foundation of San Jose and Kiva of San Francisco — both are active in
India.

Exploring New Organizational Models

On the one hand, these developments have deepened the financial market for the social sector. On the other, they have forced NGOs to break out of the traditional charity models that they were built upon. Says Vinay Somani who has set up Karmayog, a Mumbai-based B2B for NGOs, “Outside funding agencies bring in best practices, force NGOs to become more transparent and lead the entire sector to a system where self sustainability becomes a specified goal.”

Finance, along with scale and professional management practices, is creating a network of sustainable organizations. The Aaharam network is illustrative. Velayuthan experimented with other forms of social intervention before he decided on a group-based income generation model that according to him “seemed to be the answer to rural poverty and migration issues.”

Velayuthan was not the first to try out this model, but he designed it with commercial and contemporary management practices. He used money from microfinance institutions to set up a company, set specific production and sales targets (for example: the amount of mango pulp to be sold in a month) and ensured that the company scaled up within a given period of time. He also worked to build strong managerial skills among his team by organizing monthly meetings and routine interactions with private industry.

Aaharam’s goal is to address food, nutrition and income security of producers from resource-poor areas. It largely works with rural women, taps into their expertise to make a wide range of agro products, and helps them market these through a company within a specific district or zone. “We wanted to stop migration [out of rural areas], and the only way to do that was to create reliable income sources during lean agricultural months,” says Velayuthan, whose initial funding came from MFIs. “We looked at five broad areas where this expertise could be used, and classified these as neem, tamarind, medicinal plants, traditional crafts and charcoal.”

Velayuthan says he faced his biggest hurdle in setting up the company; next came the first milestone of breaking even. Aaharam charges its members a fee. This serves as working capital for the company. It also seeks out marketing and retail tie-ups that would bring in funds for expansion and business development. It already has a tie-up with the Mumbai-based Parle group for the sale of mango pulp and has recently entered into a contract with Bharat Petroleum for producing fuel pellets from agro-waste.

Aaharam is only one of the instances of the work being done in the rural sector. Says Vineet Rai of Aavishkaar, “The entire rural space has come alive in the past few years. There is a huge pipeline and we can’t respond to all of them.” When he started out in 2002, things were very different. “There were not many projects that we could invest in at the time. We used to get about two applications a month then. We are now getting an application a day.”

Forming Networking Platforms and Communities

Rangsutra is a company that Aavishkaar supports. It has, within a year of being set up, established a small export market and a link with urban retailers such as FABIndia for the linen and hand embroidered clothes it makes. Says Sumita Ghose, “It is a difficult process, but we have learned to get out of the NGO mindset. Managing cash flows was a unique experience, but it has helped us focus and think our strategies through.”

Another example is LabourNet. Run by Solomon J. P., it started out as an organization that looked after the rights of construction workers. It has evolved into a complete database of construction workers in and around Bangalore that links industry and laborers and facilitates training programs targeted at the construction workers. “We charge a fee from the company and the workers. We also offer our services to companies that want to train the workers, and that becomes a steady revenue stream.” LabourNet helps the workers get medical and other workplace benefits and works with the companies to enhance productivity.

The network has tremendous community contact, which opens other doors. LabourNet has won contracts with Bosch to market the latter’s tools to construction workers; with microfinance companies; and with a waterproofing company that wants construction workers to use its products. Says Solomon, “Workers get these products cheap because they are buying in bulk; the water-proofing company benefits as it gets bulk orders, and we get the funds to run our network.”

The Individual Makes Way for the Organization

Most of these organizations are also developing professional management teams to run their daily operations. That is vastly different from the earlier NGO model of centralized decision making that was usually dependent on a charismatic founder or a committed charity organization. This is partly due to the nature of the projects being planned and the increased volume of funds flowing into the sector. Says Varun Sahni of Acumen, “We don’t invest in an individual. We look for an organization.” Acumen representatives are part of the beneficiary organization’s management board and participate in the decision-making.

Professional participation is welcomed by people from within and outside the social sector. Says Karmayog’s Somani, whose portal aims to connect NGOs with those who want to fund, help or seek their help, “We want to ensure that the NGO sector has access to trained and educated professionals.” For instance, Karmayog has been working on civic issues in the city of
Mumbai and has effectively used systematic networking between lawyers, academics and engineers to initiate dialogue between citizens and the local municipal corporation.

Several donor agencies are also driving NGOs to inject professional management approaches. Says Venkat Krishnan of GiveIndia, part of Give Foundation, “For us, the driving force is empowering both NGOs and donors. By allowing NGOs to state what they want support for, we are allowing them to focus on their missions and strategies the way they wish to. And by allowing donors to choose which projects they want to donate to, we are ensuring that there is an automatic ‘market pressure’ to encourage efficiency and effectiveness.”

The Flip Side of Getting Business-like

While these are sound and logical arguments, there is of course a flip side. Professional management, scale and sustainability may well be the way to go for the social sector, but not all socially relevant projects lend themselves to a market-oriented rigor.

India does not have a social security network like many developed countries. It often falls upon the voluntary sector to look after the marginalized sections of society such as abused children and women, the poor, the mentally challenged and other underprivileged sections of society. Funds are hard to come by for these projects as they do not fit the new mold. The challenge going forward is for this segment of the social sector to redefine the rules.

Source : http://knowledge.wharton.upenn.edu/

SWOT MATRIX of INDIA: Analysis of Indian Social- Economic- Political- Technological conditions.

January 31, 2007

Dear Friends,  

There are few questions about our complex & unique system of India. How we can change our system thinking? How we can make a synergetic triangle: Industry-GOI- Institution for co creation of knowledgeable resources for evolution of innovations. 

Root Causes – Why Plans are not execute at the bottom? Constrains – Where are missing link?

Strategy & tactics – What is the action plans? Methods-how these actions plans execute for achieving the end Goal.

Kindly download one page colored framework of SWOT MATRIX of INDIA. URL: syenrgetic-trinangle-industry-government-instituion.docsyenrgetic-trinangle-industry-government-instituion.doc  

SW0T   ANALYSIS:

                  Industry-GOVERNMENT -institution

 STRENGTHS 

  • Highly educated , skilled ,young, capable & dynamic  human resources
  • English speaking & analytical students
  • World class business-social-spiritual –political leader, Professor, scientist, Manager-Doctor-Engineer-Civil servants etc
  • Very rich in  Natural & Living resources
  • Biodiversity & Traditional knowledge base
  • Diversity vs. Ideas-Innovation-Integration
  • Powerful spiritual strength (yoga-Ayurvada-Healing-therapy services)
  • Geographical location (whole markets are shifting toward Asian nations)
  • India Strategic position at various platforms
  • Big democracy, Big market & free media
  • Range of emerging professional champions
  • IT & Software superpower

WEAKNESSES: 

  • Lack of trained & skill work force  
  • Small supply of specialize professional
  • Lack of spirits of entrepreneurship, patriotisms and leadership skill
  • Lack of effective & execution framework
  • Lack of Indian management models
  • Lack of transparency-Trust-Responsibility
  • Lack of learning habits & Team work spirit
  • Fear of sharing knowledge & taking risk
  • Thinking win-lose   lose-win   look-outside
  • Slow absorption of Innovation & change
  • Lack of Indian management models
  • Absence of greater technology impetus
  • Unawareness: Quality-Standardization
  • Lack of Emotional-Spiritual development
  • Rush of getting high marks not Development
  • Blindly respect anything taught by elders

THREATS (Internal & external): 

  • A feeling of unstable government
  • Self centered political leadership
  • Slow & Dysfunctional judiciary and corrupt law enforcers
  • Regulation, protection and restriction
  • Mechanistic -stable-Layered-complex system
  • Corruption, Ignorance & Complacency
  • High competitive & marketing forces
  • To patent Indian intellectual property by outsider (unawareness about own research)
  • Fast change Internet-information technology& new Inventions-Technology-Innovations
  • Diversity vs. Imbalance- clashes
  • Regional-Religion-caste-culture conflicts
  • Migration of all branch to software job
  • Job seeking mind sets, not job creator
  • Unnecessary social pressure on students
  • Excessive rich & powerful mindsets

 OPPORTUNITIES 

  • Big potential market in education Sector & emerging new market Segment in services (create it)   
  • General Agreement of trade on Services
  • Research & Development capability
  • Generate intellectual property
  • Resource Building capacity
  • Competition- cost – Quality service

  • Collaboration : win-win thinking
  • Hybrid solution–balancing & blending
  • Tourism, health sector, food processing
  • Rural economy development & social transformation ( PURA model )
  • Need  modernization of infrastructure , Library and laboratory
  • Internet institute network & e-Library
  • Councilors and student advisors

Key:
India has lots of weakness but this is a space of thinking (new Ideas or new perceptions), understand it as a space of opportunities and transform into strength.  

Note: Please send your suggestions, experiences & questions for improvement of this SWOT MATRIX of India. 

Ajay Singh Niranjan ( ajay_uor@yahoo.com)

Pratham:Educating the government

January 29, 2007

Pratham shook up the world of education in India with its path-breaking survey in 2005, and it has now released the 2006 report. The findings of this report are striking and important. In rural India, of 100 children in the age group 7-16, the survey finds that 71.3 go to a government school while 18.5 per cent go to a private school.

The share of private schools has grown sharply—by around two percentage points—over the last one year. It is believed that the shift to private schools is driven by three kinds of reasons. First, government schools have low-quality teaching. Second, government schools are mostly not English medium. Third, Dalits and Muslims are often not welcome at government schools.

Parents choose between free government schools, which are extremely well-funded, and expensive, under-funded private schools. It is important to notice that this is a survey of rural India, where a private “school” is often little more than a few benches under a tree.

Government schools are backed by the state with massive expenditures. The fact that parents choose to pay money to send a child to a private school, when they have the option of paying nothing at a government school, speaks volumes for the failure of the government education system. At all ages, more boys are sent to private schools.

In Jammu & Kashmir, Punjab, Haryana, UP, Meghalaya, Nagaland, Manipur, Goa and Kerala, the fraction of children going to private schools exceeds 30 per cent. In other words, spending more on government schools might not be the best way for politicians to curry favour with voters.

Pratham has also done important work on measuring what children actually learn, as opposed to the enrolment rates trumpeted by the government. The picture is downright dismal. Skills that ought to be found by the 2nd standard are often achieved only by the 8th standard. This raises serious questions about the UPA’s decision to impose an education cess and spend more on Sarva Shiksha Ahibyan.

It is unjust for a government to impose taxes, and then spend only for government schools, giving citizens no choice about how their children should be educated. It would make much more sense for public expenditures to be placed under the control of parents: going to the school that parents choose, ideally with a performance-based payment linked to the test scores of the child. The education bureaucracy will not like this.

The CPI(M) excels at converting government expenditures into party funding, by recruiting party cadre as school teachers. This tactic will not work if parents are empowered. What India needs most today is a policy which puts parents back at the centre of education policy.

If reports such as this had been produced 50 years ago, and fed back into policy-making, India might not have faced mass illiteracy today, rooted as it is in badly designed public programmes like the Sarva Shiksha Abhiyan.

The biggest weakness of the Pratham report is that it only covers rural India. India’s GDP is largely made in urban India, and the problems of urban India too are important. What children learn, and the role of private schools, are equally important in urban areas since they are after all the engines of growth.

Source : 11 Jan 2007, Business Standard

Real & Virtual India – Transforming India

January 27, 2007

                                                   The Real India                           The Virtual India

Who stays here? People of
India in 35 states
NRI’s & PIO’s in 5 continents
Gross domestic Product US$ 692 billion about US$ 240 billion
Per Capita Earning US$ 625/year/person about US$ 10,000/year/person
Savings Per Year US$ 100 billion** about US$ 75 – 80 billion**
INDIA’s external debt US$ 121 billion N.A.
Total FDI last Year (2005) US$ 6 billion N.A.
FDI investment by NRI’s US$ 0.2 billion (in 2004) N.A.
Population 1090 million 20 – 22 millions

1. Understanding the Real and Virtual India!
There are two India’s, one where we live and the other is the Virtual India, with an estimated GDP of US $ +240 billion per year, where about 20 to 25 million NRI’s and PIO’s live.Their hearts are in India and they are emotionally tied to India. If we can attract them and woo them, they could be a good source of funding projects for India’s growth plans.

The Chinese have learnt the art of wooing and managing their NRC’s who number about 55 to 50 million. Last year the NRC’s invested about US$ 70 billion into China + Hong Kong + Macau. India, inspite of its best efforts, received only US$ 0.2 billion from NRI’s last year!

India imports nearly US$ 8 to 10 billion worth of Gold every year. This means that we have imported nearly US$ 96 to 120 billion worth of Gold, in the last 12 years, since liberalization of the economy.

We should try to find ways to ‘funnel’ this retail investment into more economical areas, to benifit the Nation and it’s people.

2. How has China managed to get large FDI inflows from the NRC’s?
Maybe, there is a lesson to be learnt by us, as to how China is able to woo its NRC’s!
The largest banks in Hong Kong, HSBC and Standard Chartered, may be able to throw some light on how the NRC’s have been able to invest so much in to China and Hong Kong.

• FDI …. means – Foreign Direct Investment • US$ 1 billion is Rs. 4900 crores
• NRI …. means – Non Resident Indian • N.A ….. means not applicable
• NRC … means – Non Resident Chinese • **means , estimated figures
• PIO …. means – People of India Origin
3. India’s POT of GOLD —how can we get it back?
It is estimated that a large amount of “Indian Money”, is lying outside India, due to poor governance & administration of India and due to past regimes of controls and high taxation. If India can put its “House in Order”, to near World Class Standards, a substantial part of this money could easily come back to drive the Indian economy.

Unofficial estimates of Indian funds lying outside, range from US$ 400 billion to US$ 800 billion! India’s total foreign debt is about US$121 billion.

The interest rates are very low in the international markets and interest rates are also dropping in India. NRI’s and PIO’s would be interested to invest in Indian paper with reasonable rate of interest and attartive tax incentives.

The Indian Central and State Governments should plan for 10-15-20 year Infrastructure Bonds, with a coupon rate of 4 to 5%, both for domestic Citizens as well as for NRI’s, with tax breaks and incentives. Or it could be a floating rate, based on some standard base rate, + a premium of 100 to150 basis points.

India requires US$ 500 to US$800 billion for Education, Health Care, connecting the Water Ways and Rivers, for Ports, Airports, Railways and Roads.

After the 2nd World war, when Germany was devasted, the German Government came out with a similar scheme to build the Nation. China has had a novel scheme for many years. It may be a good time to consider such proposals. The present rate of borrowing for Infrastructure Projects is too high!

4. Only Good Governance and Effective Administration can attract higher FDI into India and induce money to flow back.

Kindly write for more complete information & details of i watch-Transformaing India booklet.

Ajay Singh Niranjan ( ajay_uor@yahoo.com)

i watch www.wakeupcall.org Education 1st

551, 2nd Floor , Mukherji Nagar, Delhi -110009

National Innovation Foundation …in Support of Grassroots Innovations

January 26, 2007

“……the time has come to unleash the creative potential of our scientists and innovators at grassroots level. Only then we can make
India truly self-reliant and a leader in sustainable technologies….propose a national foundation for helping innovators all over the country. This fund will build a national register of innovations, mobilize intellectual property protection, set up incubators for converting into viable business opportunities and help in dissemination across the country.”

Mission

To help
India become an inventive and creative society and a global leader in sustainable technologies without social and economic handicaps affecting evolution and diffusion of green grassroots innovations
 

Goals

 

To help
India become an inventive and creative society and a global leader in sustainable technologies.

To ensure evolution and diffusion of green grassroots innovations in a time bound and mission oriented manner.

To support scouting, spawning, sustaining and scaling up of grassroots green innovations and link innovations, enterprises and investments.

To strengthen R&D linkages between excellence in formal and informal knowledge systems and create a Knowledge Network.

To promote wider social awareness and possible commercial and non-commercial applications of innovations and incorporate the same in education curriculum, development programs and policies.

For more Kindly Link National Innovtion Foundation:http://nifindia.org/  in support of grassroots. Innovation